Swiss Ritual – Exploration of Swiss Minimalism

Swiss Ritual, a weekly visual and aural exploration of creating one album per week through the lens of Swiss minimalism.

Swiss Ritual is an ongoing graphic design project with the intention to explore the visual realm in its most minimal form by creating one alternative album cover per week through the lens of Swiss minimalism. You can follow this project here. Below you can see all the current graphics.

Matt and Kim – New Glow – Minimalist poster design.
Matt and Kim – New Glow – Minimalist poster design.
Attack in Black – Curve of the Earth – Album cover design in a Swiss minimalist style.
Attack in Black – Curve of the Earth – Album cover design in a Swiss minimalist style.
Of Monsters and Men – Beneath the Skin – Graphic Design from an ongoing project called "Swiss Ritual".
Of Monsters and Men – Beneath the Skin – Graphic Design from an ongoing project called “Swiss Ritual”.
Swiss Ritual, a weekly visual and aural exploration of creating one album per week through the lens of Swiss minimalism.
Swiss Ritual, a weekly visual and aural exploration of creating one album per week through the lens of Swiss minimalism. Local Natives – Hummingbird; Titus Andronicus – Local Business; Kathleen Edwards – Voyageur; At the Drive-In – This Station is Non-Operational; The Decemberists – What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World; Sufjan Stevens – Carrie & Lowell; The War on Drugs – Lost in the Dream; Death Cab for Cutie – Kintsugi; Thee Oh Sees – Mutilator Defeated At Last; Mumford & Suns – Wilder Mind; Passion Pit – Kindred; The National – Trouble Will Find Me; Peter Bjorn and John – Writers Block; Shakey Graves – And The War Came; Father John Misty – I Love You Honeybear; Modest Mouse – Strangers to Ourselves; The Tallest Man On Earth – Dark Bird is Home; Lord Huron – Strange Trails.

Get inspired and check out more work in our Graphic Design category.

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1 COMMENT

  1. Kudos for your homage to Swiss Design. My long career in graphic, environmental, and branding design has brought me full circle. Swiss design sparked my early career when popular culture was shaking off the excesses of the psychedelic 60s and 70s. I was instinctively drawn to the clarity and sense of order to be found in the Swiss design movement. Some call this style minimalist and reductive; I call it visual Zen. And, the Grid System that supposedly dominates the Swiss approach to layout is—to my eye—less about visual authoritarianism and more about a seductive embrace of the very human response to pattern recognition. Grids in the best of Swiss design emerge organically, more as suggestions for visual alignment that instinctively feel clean and modern. Beyond just a dry aesthetic theory informing the organization of space, Swiss design is a visual calling, a search for visual purity that is as playful as it is serene. It is an invitation to enter an arena of exquisite visual haiku—where what you don’t say is as important as what you do say. The Swiss design language has never left me; in fact, I seem to be reveling in its apparent renaissance.

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