Stop browsing and keep on track with this list of 10 amazing Google Fonts you definitely should know!

With Google Fonts, it’s quite easy to use web fonts but finding the perfect typeface for a certain project, can be a time-consuming task. All typefaces on the platform can be used for both personal and commercial projects but the huge amount of Google Fonts can be overwhelming and seriously—many of them are not what we would recommend to you. To save you much time browsing and filtering through the sheer number of free fonts, here comes a handpicked list of 10 Google Fonts you should definitely know. Just to be clear: we don’t want to say these are the best Google Fonts you can find nor is this article meant to give you a top ten ranking of free fonts. Our aim was to show you a selected range of fonts that work well for different projects. So here comes our compilation of 10 Google Fonts that you can implement into a great variety of web and design projects.

Open Sans

Designed by Steve Matteson, Type Director of Ascender Corp, Open Sans is a humanist sans-serif font. The typeface is mainly characterized by an upright stress, open forms, and a friendly, quite modern appearance. The character set comprises 897 glyphs in order to support all common Latin, Greek, and Cyrillic writing systems. It is available in 5 weights plus matching Italic versions. With its excellent legibility, Open Sans is a great choice for print, web, and mobile interfaces. Popular pairings with Open Sans are Roboto, Lato, Oswald, Raleway, and Montserrat.

More here: fonts.google.com/specimen/Open+Sans

Open Sans Google Font
Open Sans

Noto Serif

Published directly by Google Fonts, Noto (here to see in it’s Japanese Serif edition) aims to support all languages in the world! Quite impressive, isn’t it? Noto Serif JP comes with Extra-Light, Light, Regular, Medium, Semi-Bold, Bold and Black styles. Popular Pairings with Noto Serif JP are Open Sans, Raleway, Lato, Montserrat, and Oswald. You can download the whole Noto font family at google.com/get/noto

More about Noto Serif JP here: fonts.google.com/specimen/Noto+Serif+JP

Noto Serif JP Google Font
Noto Serif

Roboto

Type designer Christian Robertson has developed the Roboto typeface with a dual nature. On the one hand, the font family is characterized by a mechanical structure and all letterforms are largely geometric. On the other hand, Roboto provides a quite friendly and open appearance. Equipped with a large range of styles including Thin, Light, Regular Medium, Bold, Black, and matching Italics, this family works great for both print and on screen. Its regular family can be used alongside Roboto Condensed and Roboto Slab as well as Open Sans, Lato, Montserrat, Raleway, and Oswald.

More here: fonts.google.com/specimen/Roboto

Roboto Google Font
Roboto

Vollkorn

Vollkorn is an elegant serif font family. Its regular style was Friedrich Althausen’s first type designing attempt, which has been published in 2005 under a Creative-Commons-License. The typeface quickly gained great popularity and after only two years, it had been downloaded thousands of times. Today, Vollkorn is available as free Google Font in 4 weights (Regular, Semi-Bold, Bold, and Black) plus matching Italics for each weight. With its dark and meaty serifs, it can be used for both print and web design projects. Popular pairings with Vollkorn are Lato, Open Sans, Roboto, Oswald, and Ubuntu.

More here: fonts.google.com/specimen/Vollkorn

Vollkorn Google Font
Vollkorn

Maven Pro

Here comes another sans-serif typeface. The Maven Pro font family has been produced by Joe Prince for the web. This modern typeface is characterized by unique curves and a flowing rhythm. Due to the omission of Italics, we would recommend this family primarily for headlines and only short sections. It includes 4 weights (Regular, Medium, Bold, and Black). Popular pairings with Maven Pro are the following Google Fonts: Open Sans, Roboto, Montserrat, Playfair Display, and Oswald.

More here: fonts.google.com/specimen/Maven+Pro

Maven Pro Google Font
Maven Pro

PT Mono

PT Mono by ParaType is intended for forms, tables, worksheets, etc. Based on only equal character widths, PT Mono is the perfect free typeface for setting up complex documents. At the moment, PT Mono consists of only one Regular style. It has been designed by Alexandra Korolkova in collaboration with Isabella Chaeva and the friendly support by Google Web Fonts. Popular pairings include PT Sans, PT Serif, Open Sans, Roboto, and Ubuntu.

More here: fonts.google.com/specimen/PT+Mono

PT Mono Google Font
PT Mono

Indie Flower

Compared to the 6 typefaces above, here comes something quite different. Designed by Kimberly Geswein, Indie Flower is a friendly handwriting typeface with a carefree and open look. Nothing for long editorials, but Indie Flower looks nice in quotes or on greeting cards. People often like to combine it with Open Sans, Lato, Oswald, Roboto, and Raleway.

More here: fonts.google.com/specimen/Indie+Flower

Indie Flower Google Font
Indie Flower

Source Code Pro

Created by type designer Paul D. Hunt, Source Code Pro is the companion to Source Sans. As the name suggests, this monospaced version is intended for coding applications. It contains 7 weights (Extra-Light, Light, Regular, Medium, Semi-Bold, Bold, and Black), which is not typical for a coding typeface. This way, Source Code Pro is also a great choice for plenty of design applications. It also supports various languages and future releases are expected to add support for Greek and Cyrillic scripts, Italics, and several other features. So stay tuned. Popular pairings with Source Code Pro are Open Sans, Roboto, Montserrat, Lato, and Playful Display.

More here: fonts.google.com/specimen/Source+Code+Pro

Source Code Pro Google Font
Source Code Pro

Cardo

Currently equipped with three styles (Regular, Regular Italic, and Bold), Cardo was designed by David Perry. It’s a Unicode font specifically produced for the needs of classicists, Biblical scholars, medievalists, and linguists. Apart from that, you can also use it for general typesetting and all applications that ask for a sophisticated “old style”. Cardo comes with numerous typographic features such as ligatures, text figures (known as old style numerals), several punctuations, and space characters. It is often used in combination with Open Sans, Lato, Raleway, Roboto, and Playful Display.

More here: fonts.google.com/specimen/Cardo

Cardo Google Font
Cardo

Quicksand

Last but not least, here comes Quicksand, a display sans-serif family with rounded terminals. Initiated by designer Andrew Paglinawan in 2008, this typeface was made for display purposes. Thanks to its great readability, it can also be used in small text sizes. Quicksand includes 4 weights (Light, Regular, Medium, and Bold). In 2016, Andrew and Thomas Jockin revised the typeface to improve its quality. Popular pairings include Open Sans, Roboto, Lato, Montserrat, and Raleway.

More here: fonts.google.com/specimen/Quicksand

Quicksand Google Font
Quicksand

This was our list of 10 Google Fonts you should know. For those of you looking for other typefaces, feel free to check out our Fonts category. Our longtime readers know and appreciate our large range of font reviews.

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